Column: The Vault of Secrets: The Mole People (1956)

By Orrin Grey

spoilers ahead

The Mole People (1956)  Director: Virgil Vogel. Cast: John Agar, Cynthia Patrick, Hugh Beaumont.

Welcome back to the Vault of Secrets, where, every other week, we’ll be unearthing a classic (or not-so-classic) vintage horror film for your delectation. For tonight’s film, we’re completing our drive-in double-feature of 50s sci-fi monster movies (the first half of which was last episode’s Tarantula) with The Mole People, a film which came out just a year later. …

Orrin GreyColumn: The Vault of Secrets: The Mole People (1956)

Review: Fright Night (2011)

By Silvia Moreno-Garcia

It’s not worth pondering why Fright Night was remade. Most 80s horror movies are being remade. And remakes are not, by default, bad. Take John Carpenter’s The Thing. On the other hand, you can glance at the most recent Nightmare on Elm Street and realize that things can go mighty wrong when you’re filming a movie anew. However, in the case of the re-vamped (pun intended) Fright Night, it works.

The premise is the same: …

Silvia Moreno-GarciaReview: Fright Night (2011)

Column: Cthulhu Eats the Movies: Bits O’ Lovecraft

By Brian M. Sammons

Welcome back, my fellow cinecephalophiles. This time, I thought I’d do a little something different with the old Cthulhu Eats the Movies and, instead of just talking about one movie, I’d cover a few, very quickly, because they have almost nothing to do with Lovecraft. Well, then, why cover them at all? I hear you ask. Because these films are sometimes linked to HPL, due to a namedrop or two, and to not cover them in …

Brian M. SammonsColumn: Cthulhu Eats the Movies: Bits O’ Lovecraft

Column: Cthulhu Eats the Movies: Beyond the Wall of Sleep

By Brian M. Sammons

Beyond the Wall of Sleep. Directors: Barrett J. Leigh, Thom Maurer. Cast: George Peroulas, Fountain Yount, William Sanderson.

Remember last time, when I was talking about movies that start with “H.P. Lovecraft’s” and yet, have absolutely nothing to do with the man or his tales? Well, here’s a prime example of that. Don’t let the title fool you; it has almost nothing to do with the Lovecraft story of the same name, other than …

Brian M. SammonsColumn: Cthulhu Eats the Movies: Beyond the Wall of Sleep

Column: The Vault of Secrets: The Devil-Doll (1936)

Orrin Grey

The Devil-Doll (1936). Director: Tod Browning. Cast: Lionel Barrymore, Maureen O’Sullivan.

Welcome back to the Vault of Secrets, where, every other week, we’ll be unearthing a classic (or not-so-classic) vintage horror film for your delectation. Tonight’s movie is The Devil-Doll, which re-teams director Tod Browning and star Lionel Barrymore, whom we last saw together in our first installment, The Mark of the Vampire. The version I watched is once again from the Hollywood Legends of Horror

Orrin GreyColumn: The Vault of Secrets: The Devil-Doll (1936)

Review: Roanoke: Lost Colony: The Legend of Roanoke

By Silvia Moreno-Garcia

The Lost Colony: The Legend of Roanoke (2007). Director: Matt Codd. Starring: Adrian Paul.

What can you expect from a SyFy Channel movie, from the makers of giant octopus and shark flicks? Not much. But I’m an optimist and the idea of using Roanoke, that early American settlement from which everyone vanished several centuries ago, does have potential. As I’ve said before, mysterious vanishings are always a great source of inspiration because they tackle our deepest fear: …

IFPReview: Roanoke: Lost Colony: The Legend of Roanoke

Review: Teeth

By B.A. Campbell

Teeth (2007). Director: Mitchell Lichtenstein. Cast: Jess Weixler, John Hensley.

If you’ve seen any advertisements for writer/director Mitchell Lichtenstein’s 2007 film, Teeth, you think you know what to expect. Following the unfortunate exploits of virtuous teen Dawn (Jess Weixler), the film presents the most excessively literal interpretation of vagina dentata yet seen in American cinema.

Now, I like me some vagina dentata as much as the next guy. The concept, which literally means “toothed [you can …

IFPReview: Teeth

Review: Carrie (2002)

By Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Carrie (2002) Directed by David Carson. Cast: Angela Bettis, Patricia Clarkson.

Since we’ve got a review of Teeth coming up this week, a tale of a teenager with some bizarre modifications, I thought I’d review Carrie, another teenager with an unusual gift.
Carrie was wildly successful upon its release. The reason? I’m guessing because we’ve all met (or been) a Carrie. You know: the bullied kid at the bottom of the social ladder whom everyone loves …

IFPReview: Carrie (2002)

Column: From Strange and Distant Shores: The Abominable Snowman (1957)

By Orrin Grey

The Abominable Snowman (1957). Director: Val Guest. Cast: Peter Cushing, Forrest Tucker. Country: England.

This month, I was asked to help organize Monster Awareness Month at Beyond Fiction. There are going to be posts about monsters in movies, books, comics, and everywhere else for the entire month of February, and there’s also going to be a monster movie a day. In honor of the occasion, I thought I’d turn this month’s From Strange & Distant Shores …

IFPColumn: From Strange and Distant Shores: The Abominable Snowman (1957)

Column: From Strange and Distant Shores: The Host (2006)

By Orrin Grey

The Host (2006). Director: Joon-ho Bong. Cast: Kang-ho Song, Ah-sung Ko. Country: South Korea.

I watched The Host, back when it first came out and, in spite of the hype that surrounded it then, I didn’t much care for it. When it showed up on the movie list for Monster Awareness Month, I figured I’d give it another shot for this column. Unfortunately, I didn’t like it any better this time out.

I realize that I …

IFPColumn: From Strange and Distant Shores: The Host (2006)

Shivers and Sighs Week: Review: The Countess (2009)


By Silvia Moreno-Garcia

The Countess (2009). Director: Julie Delpy Cast: Julie Delpy, Daniel Brühl.

Erzsébet (or Elizabeth to English-speakers) Báthory is a character whose life has been coloured more by fiction and speculation than fact. I once read a book which said she’d been bitten by a vampire and took this concept quite seriously. The book was not intended as fiction. It has been hard, thus, for an accurate picture of Elizabeth to pierce the veil of time and few …

IFPShivers and Sighs Week: Review: The Countess (2009)

Review: Masque of the Red Death (1991)

By Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Masque of the Red Death (1991). Director: Alan Birkinshaw. Actors: Frank Stallone, Brenda Vaccaro.

I am not averse to bad movies. Bad movies can be pretty entertaining, as my occasional reviews may have demonstrated. Now that Netflix is in Canada, I’ve had a chance to plumb the depths of B-horror for less than $10 a month. The result? I’ve watched a lot of subpar stuff but nothing that compares to Masque of the Red Death. Do …

IFPReview: Masque of the Red Death (1991)