Column: Gods and Monsters: Review: The Sorcerer and the White Snake (2011)

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Gods and Monsters: 2013

By Paula R. Stiles

The Sorcerer and the White Snake (Bai she chuan shuo) (2011). Director: Siu-Tung Ching. Cast: Jet Li, Shengyi Huang, Raymond Lam. Country: China.

[spoilers ahead]

A young herbalist, Xu Xian (Raymond Lam), falls in love with a kind young woman, Susu (Shengyi Huang), after she saves him from drowning. Complications ensue when the stern demon hunter, Abbot Fahai (Jet Li), …

Paula R. StilesColumn: Gods and Monsters: Review: The Sorcerer and the White Snake (2011)

Cthulhu Eats the World: Review: Sinister (2012)

This entry is part 1 of 15 in the series Cthulhu Eats the World: 2013

By Brian M. Sammons

Sinister (2012). Director: Scott Derrickson. Cast: Ethan Hawke, Juliet Rylance, James Ransone.

New, non-remake, non-sequel horror movies are as rare as a lingerie model coming from Innsmouth. Good new horror films are all but mythical. Yes, I’m looking at you, The Apparition. So, when a horror flick comes out that’s both new and good, then I’m happy to pick up …

Brian M. SammonsCthulhu Eats the World: Review: Sinister (2012)

Column: The Vault of Secrets: The Thing from Another World (1951)

By Orrin Grey

The Thing from Another World (1951). Director: Christian Nyby (& Howard Hawks?). Starring: Kenneth Tobey, Margaret Sheridan, & James Arness.

Welcome back to the Vault of Secrets, where we’ll be unearthing another classic (or not-so-classic) vintage horror film for your delectation. Difficult as it may be to believe, this was actually my first viewing of tonight’s film, in spite of the fact that John Carpenter’s 1982 remake (simply titled ‘The Thing‘) has the distinction of …

Orrin GreyColumn: The Vault of Secrets: The Thing from Another World (1951)

Column: Slicing Score: The Wicker Man (1973)

By Maria Mitchell

The Wicker Man (1973). Composer: Paul Giovanni.

The plot of The Wicker Man is rooted in fundamentalism. Fundamentalism can be summed up as: It is what we believe. The thoughts of the community of Summerisle in this film can be summed up as: If we believe our life will benefit from your death, then it will.

Sgt. Howie is a police investigator that travels to Summerisle to search for a missing girl named ‘Rowan Morrison.’ It soon …

Maria MitchellColumn: Slicing Score: The Wicker Man (1973)

Column: Cthulhu Eats the World: The Loved Ones

By Brian M. Sammons

The Loved Ones. Director: Sean Byrne. Cast: Xavier Samuel, Robin McLeavy, Victoria Thaine.

This 2009 Australian, low budget, brutal, sometimes bloody, and very effective horror movie has finally made its way to North America, thanks to Paramount. Was it worth the wait? Did it live up to the critical hype, assuming that you’ve heard anything about it at all?

Yes, yes, it did. But be warned: I can see this movie falling into the category …

Brian M. SammonsColumn: Cthulhu Eats the World: The Loved Ones

Column: Cthulhu Eats the World: Altitude (2010)

By Brian M. Sammons

Altitude (2010). Director: Kaare Andrews. Cast: Jessica Lowndes, Julianna Guill, Ryan Donowho.

If you’ve seen the poster or DVD case for this movie, then your Lovecraft loving appetite might have been whetted like mine was. It shows a guy hanging out of a small airplane in flight, surrounded by dark clouds, with a couple of huge tentacles reaching out to grab him. For a rabid fan of H.P. Lovecraft, the mind reels with the possibilities such …

Brian M. SammonsColumn: Cthulhu Eats the World: Altitude (2010)

Column: The Vault of Secrets: The Old Dark House (1932)

By Orrin Grey

The Old Dark House (1932). Directed by: James Whale. Starring: Boris Karloff, Melvyn Douglas, Charles Laughton, Gloria Stuart, and Ernest Thesiger.

Welcome back to the Vault of Secrets, where we’ll be unearthing another classic (or not-so-classic) vintage horror film for your delectation. I am hard-put to ever list a single favorite movie, in any category, no matter how narrowly-defined. But if you sat me down to start trying to make a list, James Whale’s The Old Dark

Orrin GreyColumn: The Vault of Secrets: The Old Dark House (1932)

Review: Silent Hill: Revelation (2012)

By Silvia Moreno-Garcia

No, it’s not worth the price of admission. Okay, I guess you want a full review, so let’s flash back for a little bit. The 2006 film adaptation of the Silent Hill video game was not a good horror film, but it did evoke the general look and feel of the game it was based on, had some intriguing visuals, and managed to weave together a semi-coherent script. Did the script meander too much with Sean Bean’s …

Silvia Moreno-GarciaReview: Silent Hill: Revelation (2012)

Review: Antiviral (2012)

By Silvia Moreno-Garcia

If you’ve ever wondered what “A Whiter Shade of Pale” referred to, it was probably Caleb Landry Jones in Antiviral. It is of the utmost importance that someone cast this kid as Dracula. He could be the vampire of the decade. By turns cool and detached, then horribly sick, always incredibly pale, Jones is worth the price of admission for his performance alone.

Antiviral takes place in a near-future (or alternate present, most likely) in which …

Silvia Moreno-GarciaReview: Antiviral (2012)

Column: The Vault of Secrets: Night Creatures (1962)

By Orrin Grey

Night Creatures (1962). Directed by: Peter Graham Scott. Starring: Peter Cushing, Oliver Reed, Yvonne Romain, Patrick Allen.

Welcome back to the Vault of Secrets, where we’ll be unearthing another classic (or not-so-classic) vintage horror film for your delectation. Tonight’s picture is a personal favorite of mine that may not be much of a horror movie, but that I think is very autumnal, and beautifully suited to the Halloween season. Originally released as Captain Clegg, it had …

Orrin GreyColumn: The Vault of Secrets: Night Creatures (1962)

Column: Cthulhu Eats the World: Absentia (2011)

By Brian M. Sammons

Absentia (2011). Director: Mike Flanagan. Cast: Katie Parker, Courtney Bell, Dave Levine.

How sad is it that new, original and good horror films like this have to go to places like Kickstarter to get the meager funding they require, while vapid, uninspired, CGI-bloated, and unnecessarily 3D-stuffed so-called ‘horror’ flicks like Resident Evil Part Who-Gives-A-Damn, can get millions tossed at them time and time again, no matter how horrible the previous movies were? Man, if you’re …

Brian M. SammonsColumn: Cthulhu Eats the World: Absentia (2011)